What to do about nasty tenants

What to do about nasty tenants

It is not easy for landlords to deal with terrible tenants. Some tenants pay rent late. Some make the rental property disaster. Unfortunately, most rental property owners face the trouble of dealing with difficult tenants at some point, and it is not easy.

It is understandable landlords get angry when tenants cause problems in rental property. However, it would be best if you stayed calm because being angry isn’t work. It can worsen the situation. Do not let your thoughts trouble the emotions when you talk to your tenants.

As a landlord, you need to be reasonable. So first, evaluate the situation carefully from every aspect. Then, take some time to come to the best approach. Your tenants will be a lot more responsive to what you tell them if you come across as managed and thoughtful. Here are some of the best ways to deal with bad tenants.


What are the major signs of a nasty tenants

A nasty tenant is someone who doesn’t pay the rent on time, violates a lease by having an unauthorized roommate or secret pet, or intentionally damages the property.

1Can’t pay rent on time. Or want to pay partial rent.
2Can’t pay electric bill and home is dark.
3Start complaining about everything to you including how bad the neighborhood is.
4Can’t locate their copy of the lease and asks to see it.
5Does not answer texts, calls and emails regarding late rent.
6Is generally unhappy and wants to make everyone else unhappy using any means possible
7Parks multiple cars on driveway and yard.
8Beer cans and garbage starts piling up in yard around all the cars that shouldn’t be their.
9If you start to receive calls from creditors and furniture rental places.
10When you enter the home after you gave notice and realize they are gone and trashed your home.

What are the best ways to deal with a bad tenant?

It is not easy for landlords to deal with terrible tenants. Some tenants pay rent late. Some make the rental property disaster. Unfortunately, most rental property owners face the trouble of dealing with difficult tenants at some point, and it is not easy.
Here are some of the best ways to deal with bad tenants:

1. Be Calm, Objective, and Reasonable

It is understandable landlords get angry when tenants cause problems in rental property. However, it would be best if you stayed calm because being angry isn’t work. It can worsen the situation. Do not let your thoughts trouble the emotions when you talk to your tenants.

As a landlord, you need to be reasonable. So first, evaluate the situation carefully from every aspect. Then, take some time to come to the best approach. Your tenants will be a lot more responsive to what you tell them if you come across as managed and thoughtful. This is a common problem.

2. The best method is a good renovation.

It never fails. Dead beat tenants live dead beat lives and live in a mess so you come over all nice as trying a frontal attack to get them out results in years of litigation.

Best you go in and offer to improve their accommodation, this is very confusing as it is the last thing they expect. The proviso is they have to move out into temporary accommodation.

Now you have to be a bit clever here and as builders are very unreliable if you dick the tenant around enough they usually get the hint and move on or as has happened twice they get scared of having to live in a decent place and pay more rent and look after it.



3. Keep Written Records of Everything Safely

Keeping a written record of everything can help you avoid disputes with tenants. Of course, it increases your workload, but at the same time decreases the possibility of arguments with bad tenants. So, it deserves the trouble.

During the home inspection, take pictures and videos along with the written records of your findings that feature a timestamp. It is the one way no tenant can argue with necessary security deposit deductions. It will be easy for you to get rid of bad renters.

4.Teach Tenants How They Should Treat You

Your actions reflect how you expect to be treated unless you find your tenants taking advantage of you.

For example, if your tenant does not pay rent on time and you do not enforce the lease terms, they will begin to get away with it. So, if you stand on your own rules, you’ll find yourself dealing with far fewer disputes.

And if you can’t get the result still after all the rules and lease agreement, keep following. Let your tenant believes that you are not going to drop the argument. It will make them resolve the issue quickly or face the consequences.

If month to month, tell them you are ending the tenancy (usually proper with 30 days notice); check your jurisdiction’s notice requirement.

If in a lease coming due soon, then do not renew it and let them know it will not be renewed. Start discussing move-out procedures.

5. Access Denied

Don’t change the locks, just have a trusted associate put a few drops of superglue in every lock on the place. Even better if they’re home so you can treat the car door locks too. Don’t forget the mailbox lock.

6. Accounts Cancelled

You have all of their info, so help them out with some cancellations as they’re moving out soon anyway. Terminate electric, gas, cable, internet, and anything else you can figure out that they have. Generally the utility companies won’t actually pull the meter or lock out the gas, so you can help them by sending a trusted associate to lockout the gas and pull the meter.

7.  Disconnect A/C

If it’s hot and muggy outside it’d be a horrible time to lose A/C, so let’s make sure that happens. Have a trusted associate disconnect the control wire and walk away. When the tenants call take a week or so to send out your trusted associate again posing as the HVAC guy. Tell the tenants that someone intentionally damaged the A/C, you think it’s them, and they need to pay before you fix it. A/C is not a critical life service, let them roast. If they get too pushy or get the housing authority involved, your story will be that the part is on order and will take a couple weeks to arrive.

8. Unsafe Neighborhood

Have a trusted associate slash tires and break-in all the windows on any vehicle parked outside in the wee hours of the morning. A brick through the bedroom windows will make an impression also. You’ll want to make sure you have an airtight alibi on the night this happens, preferably in a different city.

9. Frequent Blackout

Hit them where it hurts. The modern household comes to a screeching halt without electricity, so let’s fix that. Have a trusted associate damage the breaker box irrevocably, like taking an axe to it. Safety first, pull the meter or disconnect first. When the tenants call about the power being out, take a couple days and send over the electrician. When the electrician calls back with the quote for repair, call the tenant back and accuse them of intentionally damaging the electric service and demanding the fork over the cash for the repairs. If they refuse (which they will), file a police report for vandalism and state you believe the tenants did it due to the dispute or eviction in process. File a lawsuit against your tenant for damages and have them served. Don’t have an eviction lawsuit going yet? Great time to get one going by filing for an emergency eviction due to malicious damage if your courts support such an option.

10. Threaten via Privacy

DOX them. You have all of their information including SSN, former addresses, bank accounts, etc. Introduce them to the dark side of the internet. Post stories of their evil doings, especially if it you can incorporate children and felony acts. Life starts becoming really interesting at this point for the tenants.

11. Getting Physical

Have trusted associates catch one of the tenants off of the property. Coming out of work or the theater. A light working with a blackjack or billy club, but no broken bones or concussion, no need for the hospital where they’re compelled to call the police. Liberate their wallet and leave them with a promise to visit their spouse/SO/child next if they go to the police or don’t get right with the world. It will do wonders to realign thought processes.

12. Extreme Measures

End game activity here, but if you want them absolutely out at any cost, here it is. File a police report that your tenants have been making vague threats about your attempts to evict them. Nothing specific, just generalities about “You’ll be sorry” and “You’ll pay the price in the end”. Have an airtight alibi, absolutely in a different town or state and start the actions below.



What can a landlord do if a tenant damages property as revenge before leaving ?

In  2006, nasty tenant, choose to damage a place, because he was pissed off that the lease was not being renewed. Took a sledge hammer to everything before he left. In excess of 100K in damage.

Well, the owner ( also very well off ) did not take this lightly. And I had no real clue how to bring resolution outside of a violent outcome. so to the lawyers.

They came in like like wasp’s to pop, photo’s and police reports and everything else under the sun. like a case of CSI.

Long story short, police report, 2 different types of lawsuit’s, every service notice was done to the guys office and made very visible.

600k settlement to the owners favor. Owner got 200K right from the guy and a 400K payment plan with an interest rate of 7.5% yearly. Owner sends me flowers every year as a reminder, that it was the right thing to do and use the law. quick note, it’s still not paid off so it’s filled against his credit report too.

you get a legal charge or 2 from the police ( innocent till proven guilty ) for breaking ( destruction of property )

You get taken to court for the above and you get taken to court for the damages to the property.

landlords talk all the time to each other, they know how to look at the databases correctly ( no landlord will process an application without a persons passport or drivers LIC ) and will find the filings against you and most likely won’t rent to you for 7 to 15 years depending. it all ends when the full sum is collected.

How can you get a good tenant ?

Do a better job of tenant screening next time. People will beg and plead for the unit. That is a major red flag. Watch their kids if they have them, again that tells you a lot. Watch how they act and interact when they look at the place. Do credit checks and background checks on tenants. People who are irresponsible with credit (low credit score) tend to be irresponsible in general. Don’t lower your standards to be nice.

However, rent laws ussually vary from state to state so you better consult local lawyer before finalising anything.

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