Is the tenant responsible for blocked drains?

Is the tenant responsible for blocked drains?

Generally, yes. The rule, which to my knowledge is about as near universal as it gets in regards to landlord tenant
disputes, is that if damage or disfunction of fixtures in a property occurred as a result of tenant actions (except normal wear and tear), the tenant is liable.

If something breaks because it was old or crappy or simply wears out, then the landlord has to replace or repair it.

A clogged drain seems very unlikely to be caused by anything but direct action by the tenant. The only way I could see it happening otherwise is if the pipes just so befouled with build up in a super old building
or something, or perhaps if something else breaks above the drain like a piece of ceiling falls off or the like. Both of these seem like remote possibilities, and since it’s far more likely that you as the tenant put something down the drain you shouldhn’t have, yes,
you are probably responsible for clearing or replacing the affected plumbing.

A clogged drain seems very unlikely to be caused by anything but direct action by the tenant. The only way I could see it happening otherwise is if the pipes just get so befouled with build up in a super old building or something, or perhaps if something else breaks above the drain like a piece of ceiling falls off or the like. Both of these seem like remote possibilities, and since it’s far more likely that you as the tenant put something down the drain you shouldn’t have, yes,
you are probably responsible for clearing or replacing the affected plumbing.

There may possibly be circumstances where you as the tenant are more comprehensively covered, such as office leases and the like where mainternance and reasonable repairs are included, so it’s worth checking your lease. But in almost all cases I’ve ever
seen, you as tenant will have to pay for something like this.

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